FINDSTR: Searches for strings in files.


... The examples for the command "FINDSTR"
... "FINDSTR" Excerpt from Microsoft Windows Help
... Important information, tips for the "FINDSTR" command

The command: "FINDSTR" is on Windows 11, 10, .. available

The examples for the command "FINDSTR"

The `FINDSTR` command in the Windows Command Prompt is a more powerful alternative to `FIND`. It offers advanced features and supports regular expressions. Here are some examples: Example 1: Simple text search:

FINDSTR "Search term" file.txt

Description: Searches for the text "Search term" in the file "File.txt" and prints all lines that contain the string. Example 2: Ignore case sensitivity:

FINDSTR /I "search term" file.txt

Description: Ignores case sensitivity when searching for "search_term" in the file "File.txt". Example 3: Using Regular Expressions:

FINDSTR /R "^Start of line" file.txt

Description: Searches for lines in "File.txt" that start with "start of line" using regular expressions (`/R`). Example 4: Search for a string and its surroundings:

FINDSTR /C:"Search term" /C:"OtherString" /B /E File.txt

Description: Searches for the strings "SearchKey" or "OtherString" at the beginning (/B) or end (/E) of lines in "File.txt". Example 5: Search for multiple strings using regular expressions:

FINDSTR /R "Pattern1.*Pattern2" file.txt

Description: Searches for lines in "File.txt" that contain both "Pattern1" and "Pattern2". Example 6: Search for a string in all subdirectories:

FINDSTR /S "Search term" C:\Directory\*

Description: Searches for "search term" in all files in the specified directory and its subdirectories. Example 7: Searching for a string and displaying the line number:

FINDSTR /N "Search term" file.txt

Description: Searches for "search term" in "File.txt" and displays the line numbers of the lines found. Example 8: Excluding certain character strings:

FINDSTR /V "ExcludedString" file.txt

Description: Displays only the lines in File.txt that do not contain the string ExcludedString. Example 9: Search for a string with a specific character length:

FINDSTR /R "^.{5}$" file.txt

Description: Searches for lines in "File.txt" with exactly five characters. Example 10: Displaying rows with matches and surroundings:

FINDSTR /C:"Search term" /B /E /A:3 File.txt

Description: Searches for the string "Search Term" at the beginning (/B) or end (/E) of lines in "File.txt" and additionally displays three lines of surroundings (before and after the match). It is important to note that `FINDSTR` offers more possibilities than `FIND`, especially the use of regular expressions. The exact options can be accessed by `FINDSTR /?` in the command prompt.

"FINDSTR" Excerpt from Microsoft Windows Help

Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.19045.3693]
(c) Copyright 1985-2023 Microsoft Corp.

C:\\WINDOWS>

Searches for strings in files.

FINDSTR [/B] [/E] [/L] [/R] [/S] [/I] [/X] [/V] [/N] [/M] [/O] [/P] [/F:file]
        [/C:string] [/G:file] [/D:dir list] [/A:color attributes] [/OFF[LINE]]
        strings [[drive:][path]filename[ ...]]

  /B         Matches pattern if at the beginning of a line.
  /E         Matches pattern if at the end of a line.
  /L         Uses search strings literally.
  /R         Uses search strings as regular expressions.
  /S         Searches for matching files in the current directory and all
             subdirectories.
  /I         Specifies that the search is not to be case-sensitive.
  /X         Prints lines that match exactly.
  /V         Prints only lines that do not contain a match.
  /N         Prints the line number before each line that matches.
  /M         Prints only the filename if a file contains a match.
  /O         Prints character offset before each matching line.
  /P         Skip files with non-printable characters.
  /OFF[LINE] Do not skip files with offline attribute set.
  /A:attr    Specifies color attribute with two hex digits. See "color /?"
  /F:file    Reads file list from the specified file(/ stands for console).
  /C:string  Uses specified string as a literal search string.
  /G:file    Gets search strings from the specified file(/ stands for console).
  /D:dir     Search a semicolon delimited list of directories
  strings    Text to be searched for.
  [drive:][path]filename
             Specifies a file or files to search.

Use spaces to separate multiple search strings unless the argument is prefixed
with /C.  For example, 'FINDSTR "hello there" x.y' searches for "hello" or
"there" in file x.y.  'FINDSTR /C:"hello there" x.y' searches for
"hello there" in file x.y.

Regular expression quick reference:
  .        Wildcard: any character
  *        Repeat: zero or more occurances of previous character or class
  ^        Line position: beginning of line
  $        Line position: end of line
  [class]  Character class: any one character in set
  [^class] Inverse class: any one character not in set
  [x-y]    Range: any characters within the specified range
  \x       Escape: literal use of metacharacter x
  \<xyz    Word position: beginning of word
  xyz\>    Word position: end of word

For full information on FINDSTR regular expressions refer to the online Command
Reference.

Important information, tips for the "FINDSTR" command

There are a few important points to note when using the `FINDSTR` command in the Windows Command Prompt: 1. Case Sensitivity: By default, the search of `FINDSTR` is case-sensitive, meaning it is case sensitive. If you want to perform a case-insensitive search, add the `/I` option.

    FINDSTR /I "search term" file.txt
    
2. Regular Expressions: `FINDSTR` supports the use of regular expressions (`/R`), allowing advanced search capabilities. You can use regular expressions to create more complex search patterns.

    FINDSTR /R "Pattern.*Search term" file.txt
    
3. Numerous Options: `FINDSTR` has many options and switches to control the search. These include options for displaying line numbers (`/N`), ignoring case sensitivity (`/I`), searching for whole words (`/W`), displaying the number of lines found (` /C`), and many more.

    FINDSTR /N /I /W "Search term" file.txt
    
4. File Types and Binaries: `FINDSTR` defaults to searching text files. If you are looking for binary files or want to search specific file types, you should use the `/P` option.

    FINDSTR /P /I "Search term" binaryfile.bin
    
5. Environmental Variables: You can use `FINDSTR` in conjunction with environment variables to perform dynamic searches. For example:

    SET search term=example
    FINDSTR /I "%search term%" file.txt
    
6. Multiple Searches: You can use `FINDSTR` to search for multiple strings at once by specifying multiple `/C:"search_string"` options.

    FINDSTR /C:"Term1" /C:"Term2" File.txt
    
7. Redirecting output: Like `FIND`, you can redirect the output of `FINDSTR` to a file.

    FINDSTR "Search term" File.txt > FoundLines.txt
    
8. Exit Code: Similar to `FIND`, `FINDSTR` returns an exit code. An exit code of 0 means the search term was found, while an exit code of 1 means the search term was not found.

    FINDSTR "Search term" file.txt
    IF ERRORLEVEL 1 (
        ECHO The search term was not found.
    ) ELSE (
        ECHO The search term was found.
    )
    
It is important to consider the extensive options and features of `FINDSTR` and ensure that you use the appropriate options for your specific search needs. You can get the full list of options and help by typing `FINDSTR /?` in the command prompt.


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Windows-10


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The command FINDSTR - Searches for strings in files.

HTTP: ... console/en/031.htm
0.093
11647

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